Marx Lane
An Inventory of Marx Playset Figures and Accessories
Manufactured from 1951 to 1979

 
Addendum M-2 - Modern Military Playset-Related Figures
(Spanish American War and later)

Contents of this web site may not be reproduced or duplicated for use on the Internet or for commercial purposes without permission by Eric Johns.


   
    Table of Contents

      (click on name to move to section)
60mm Figures Not Found in Playsets
    Mexican War Soldiers
    U.S. Rough Riders
    Army Cadets
    World War I GIs
    Sailors
    Military Marching Band
    Queen's Life Guard
American Heroes and Similar Foreign Figures
Warriors of the World (WOW)
3-Inch GIs
4- and 5-Inch Figures
6-Inch Figures
GoldMarx Figures
     
Back to Main Table of Contents


This page covers Marx military figures that never appeared in playsets.  Still, they are often enjoyed by collectors in the same way that playset figures and accessories are enjoyed.  They were made in the same manner as playset figures and, in fact, some could be added to playsets.  On the other hand, some are made in larger scales than playset figures, and others were painted and sold more as collectable decorations than playset toys.  

60mm Figures Never Found in Playsets

In addition to the various 60mm groups of military figures that Marx made for its 1950s playsets, they also made a variety of small military groups in a similar size that were never found in playsets.  These figures were sold individually, as figure sets, and in the 1970s as the company's Warriors of the World (WOW) figures (described later on this page).  Today, they are commonly referred to as 60mm, but are often slightly larger than 60mm.  

  Mexican War Soldiers
     PL-


A small group that has been much re-issued.  I've always thought that the figure in the first photo below looks very much like a band conductor.

1.  Officer, standing with papers
2.  Marching with rifle on shoulder
Note how he is holding his rifle.
3.  Advancing with rifle held at waist


4.  Standing, firing rifle
re-issue
                            





  U.S. Rough Riders from the Spanish American War
     PL-

1.  Officer, mounted
re-issue
2.  Officer, standing
re-issue
3.  Marching with rifle on shoulder
re-issue
4.  Advancing with rifle held at waist
re-issue
                            


  U. S. Army Cadets
     PL-


These figures were later used to make Warriors of the World figures (see section near bottom of this page).
1.  Marching with sword in right hand 2.  Marching with flag
3.  Marching, rifle on shoulder
4.  Marching in overcoat 5. Standing, holding rifle in right hand on ground
                            

 

  U. S. Army World War I GIs
     PL-

Photo not available at this time.
1.  Officer, sword on left hip 2.  Running in gas mask, rifle held at waist
Photo courtesy of haileesoldtoybox.com
3.  Carrying bag of grenades
Photo courtesy of David Schafer
4.  Marching in service hat
Photo courtesy of David Schafer
5. Marching in hat with brim
Photo courtesy of David Schafer
                            

 

  U. S. Navy
     PL-415

Some of these figures were used for the World War II sailors in the Warriors of the World series.
1.  Officer at attention
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
2.  Officer holding binoculars
3.  Sailor at attention

4.  Guard standing with arms crossed
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
5.  Mopping deck
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
6.  Pulling rope
This guy is about as dirty as he really would be!

7.  With signal flags 8.  Marching with rifle on right shoulder
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
9.  Walking with duffle bag
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev

10.  Walking
Photo courtesy of haileesoldtoybox.com
                          




  U. S. Military Marching Band
     PL-366

These figures were sold both painted and unpainted.  Special thanks to veteran collector and seller Mark Hegeman for helping me complete the band!
1.  Drum Major with baton 2.  Playing cymbals
3.  Playing baritone
4.  Playing clarinet 5.  Playing trumpet 6.  Playing drum
                           




    Queen's Life Guard

  PL-

Although dubbed the Queen's Life Guard by us Americans -- and no, they do not sit around beaches looking to save drowning swimmers -- in Plastic Warrior Issue 142, Debbie Stevens points out that these figures actually "represent the Household Cavalry, which is made up of two regiments of the British Armed Forces: the Life Guards (red tunics, white plume) and the Blues and Royals (blue tunics, red plume)."  

Based on the formal uniforms of these figures and the fancy names of the units, one might assume that they handle ceremonial duties, but such is definitely not the case.  
According to Wikipedia, they are the senior regular regiments in the British Army, with traditions dating back to 1660.  Members of the regiments do act as the Queen's personal bodyguard, but
the two regiments have a long history of valiant battle action and are much decorated.  Most recently, they have served in both Iraq and Afganistan.

Ms. Stevens' article reports that the figures came in a brittle white plastic, but I believe those were the ones made at Marx' Swansea facility in Great Britain.  Geppert's Guide notes that they came in cream and silver.  The ones I have are silver with a little sheen to them.  The 60mm figures were not included in any playset, and my best guess is that they were sold as a set and perhaps individually.
Photo not available at this time.
1.  Marching with flag
2.  Trumpeter

3.  At attention with sword raised
4.  Marching with lanyard on left
 shoulder
5.  Marching without lanyard on shoulder
                            



American Heroes and Similar Foreign Figures

Beginning in the mid-1950s, Marx created figures of many U.S. generals and admirals that were sold individually, in boxed sets, and as part of a few playsets.  The initial set was of six 5-star generals and was included as part of the Marx Military Academy Play Set.  Two additional sets of 12 each came later, making a total of 30 figures.  Molded in white hard plastic, the figures stand about 2-3/4 inches tall (70 mm), including the bases.  Their names are on the front of their bases.

Ten of the figures were also included in small "American Heroes" sets, which included a general or admiral along with a handful of exisiting playset figures of the troops he would have commanded.

Besides the 30 in the three original sets, Marx created two additional generals.  General Vandergrift was available only in the American Heroes set No. 11, which featured Marines from World War II.  General Shepherd of the Korean War -- the 32nd general -- was also produced, but never sold, and was unknown until his figures were found in Marx warehouses after the company went bankrupt.

For now, the generals are placed in no particular order below, other than the original five figures being first.  Once I am able to show most of the figures, I will rearrange them in some reasonable order.


     The 5-Star Generals
1.  General Eisenhower 2.  General MacArthur 3.  General Arnold 4.  General Bradley 5.  General Marshall

     Other World War I, World War II, and Korean War Generals
6.  General Clark 7.  General Clay
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray
8.  General Doolittle
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray
9. General Gruenther

10.  General Halsey 11.  General Lemay 12.  General O'Donnell
The three photos above courtesy of Cathy Gray

13.  General Patton 14.  General Pershing
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray
15.  General Ridgeway
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray

16.  General Shepherd
Photo courtesy of David Schafer
17.  General Snyder
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray
18.  General Spaatz
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray

19.  General Stillwell
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray
20.  General Smith
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray
21.  General Vandegrift

     U.S. Naval Officers
22.  Admiral Dewey 23.  Admiral Radford 24.  Commodore Perry
Photos above courtesy of Cathy Gray

     Civil War Generals and Officers
29.  General Grant 30.  General Sheridan 31.  General Lee
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray
32.  General Pickett
 
     Other Generals and Officers

25.  General George Washington 26.  General Jackson
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray
27.  General Taylor
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray
28.  Colonel Roosevelt
Photo courtesy of Cathy Gray

Marx also made a now rare figure of Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov, who led the Russian army trough Eastern Europe to free the Soviet Union and other nations from German occupation in World War II.  He was the first commander of the Soviet Occupation Zone in Germany.  The photo below was provided by Russian collector Denis Rylev and appears to be factory-painted, but I do not know if all exisitng figures were painted.
Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov

Though not of the modern military era, another Marx figure of a military leader is Napoleon, which Louis Marx or one of his cronies made as a joke.  The joke was that while the figure generally looks like and is labeled Napoleon, it actually resembles Louis Marx himself.  Several similar figures of other notable persons that resemble Louis Marx also exist.  They are all rare, but the re-issue figure shown below can be purchased from Hobby Bunker.
Photo not available at this time.
Napoleon I/Louis Marx
re-issue on left, original on right is courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
                                    



Warriors of the World (WOW)

Perhaps the most popular Marx "playset related" collectibles are the company's Warriors of the World (WOW).  Made by the company's Hong Kong and Taiwan operations in the early 1960s, Marx created about 30 groups of painted, hard plastic "warriors."  Thirteen of these 30 groups represent modern military troops, ranging from World War I Germans to Korean War United Nations soldiers.  They are about 60mm in scale, and Marx had sold many of the poses previously sold in vinyl or soft plastic, such as some the figures shown earlier on this page.  This tactic allowed Marx to expand its product line without spending money on expensive new molds, using some of its already-existing, best-sculpted figures.

The 1994 Special Collector Edition of the Plastic Figure and Playset Collector (PFPC) magazine includes an article with significant information on all WOW figures, as well as photos of a large number of them.  Much of the information on this web page comes from that article.

Each of the WOW groups included six to nine figures, painted in a glossy, enamel-based paint.
 For Hong Kong figures, the words "Hong Kong" appear inside a circle on each figure, generally on the bottom of the base; Taiwan figures have similar circles -- sometimes a sticker -- that reads "Made in Taiwan" with a Marx logo at the center of the circle.

First sold in 1962, WOW figures were never found in playsets, with one Wild West exception. 
 Collectors are most familiar with figures sold individually in small boxes, as shown at right.  Available in many dime stores and department stores in the U. S., each figure was given a ficticious name and an imaginative brief history, which was written on a card inside the box.  The other side of the card, as well as the box, showed a drawing of the figure and the figure's name.  The figures were also sold in boxes with more than one figure, sometimes with a complete group of figures.  Window boxes sometimes contained tiny, flat accessories such as cannons or plants or terrain pieces, which the PFPC article claims "...are superior to the actual figures themselves."  Today, the accessories are harder to find than the figures!

WOW figures were introduced over several years in three series.  They were very popular when first sold, but the attraction apparently faded quickly.  Although Series I figures are common in today's collecting market, Series II and even more so Series III figures are harder to find and more expensive.  It is common to see Series I figures in good shape sell for $10, while Series III figures in near mint shape cost $50 and up.
  
According to the PFPC article, the 13 groups in a military theme of World War I and later include:

Series Theme
Series I West Point Cadets
World War II Combat Soldiers
Series II Korean War United Nations Soldiers
World War I U. S. Soldiers
World War II U. S. Marching Soldiers
World War II U. S. Sailors, dark uniforms
World War II U. S. Sailors, white uniforms
World War II U. S. Marines
Series III World War I French Soldiers
World War I German Soldiers
World War II British Soldiers
World War II German Soldiers
unknown World War II Canadian Soldiers

As part of the article on WOW figures, PFPC's 1994 Special Collector Edition 
also has brief information on two other WOW-like figures made by Marx that I do not discuss here.  These are Marx Masterpieces produced in Germany and Tiny Traders that were similar figures in HO scale.  Many of the German figures are the same as the WOW, but they 1) were painted in a flat paint rather than the glossy enamel used in Hong Kong and 2) were molded in a colored plastic that reduced required painting (such as red-brown plastic for Indians).  The German figures are stamped "Germany", usually on their base.  The Masterpiece series included a few figures not used for WOW, most notably several mounted poses.  Tiny Traders are rarely seen today, suggesting that sales were limited.  I have not seen anything that provides complete information on either the Masterpiece or Tiny Trader figures.  I'd welcome further information on them if anyone can help!

 

Series I
 
 
    West Point Cadets

These were made using the molds from the 60mm Cadets shown earlier on this page.  Note that four use the same pose, so that the group is a increased to a total of eight figures.
Photo not available at this time.
1.  James Henry, marching with rifle 2.  Roger Case, marching with rifle
Same pose as James Henry, #1
Photo courtesy of collector Jerry Woloshyn
3.  Carl Olson, standing at attention
4.  Walter Shea, marching with Army flag
Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time.
5.  Peter Mayes, marching with sword on shoulder
Photo courtesy of collector Jerry Woloshyn
6.  Henry Cowen, marching with rifle 7.  Bert Hawthorne, marching with rifle
 

     U.S. Combat Soldiers - World War II
 

These were made with various 60mm poses used in military playsets.

Photo not available at this time.
Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time.
1.  Bill James,
advancing with bayonetted rifle 
2.   Hank Meyers, sitting with scoped rifle - viewed from both sides 3.  Jim Palozzo, advancing with pistol, left hand raised 4.  Harry Byrd, lying, shooting rifle
5.  Charley Hamilton, walking in gas mask 6.  Joe Dixon, standing, firing rifle 7.  Flip Marbles, walking with ammo box 8. Dan Warner, crouching with tommy gun


Series II

     Korean War United Nations Soldiers

To the best of my knowledge, these poses are found only as a part of this group.  They are particularly hard to find.
Photo not available - we would welcome yours! Photo not available - we would welcome yours! Photo not available - we would welcome yours!
1.  Tom Gabriel, Canadian soldier 2.  Harry Oliver, British soldier 3.  Joe Sherman,
U. S. Marine
4.  Wally Elson,
U. S. Sailor
5.  Omar Kadim, Turkish Soldier
Photo not available - we would welcome yours! Photo not available - we would welcome yours! Photo not available - we would welcome yours!
6.  Lin Chang, Republic of Korea (South Korean) soldier 7.  Jacques DuBois, French soldier 8.  Win Flanagan,
U. S. Air Force pilot
9.  Doug McKenzie, Scottish Soldier

     U.S. Soldiers - World War I
 
These were made using the molds from the 60mm World War I GIs shown earlier on this page.  Note that two poses are duplicated, so that the group is a increased to a total of seven figures.
Photo not available at this time.
Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time.
1.   Frederick Garth, advancing in gas mask  2.   Harry Powell, marching with campaign hat 3.  Brad Taylor, marching with campaign hat 4.  Mark Fletcher, throwing grenade
Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time.
5.  Carl Rollins, marching officer with sword 6.  Jerry DeAngelo, marching with overseas hat 7.  Guye Wolfe, marching with overseas hat


     U.S. Marching Soldiers - World War II
   
Made from 60mm poses included in playsets, this group includes only two different poses.  I assume that Marx believed boys enjoyed lining up their soldiers to march off to war.

Photo not available at this time.
Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time.
1.  Roy Constantine, peaked cap  2.   Dick Glover, peaked cap 3.  Frank Golducci, peaked cap 4.  Chester Wordell, peaked cap
Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time.
5.  Clem Bronson, helmet 6.  Bob Chilton, helmet 7.  Jake Coley, helmet 8. Cliff Adamson, helmet



     U.S. Sailors (dark uniforms) - World War II
 
These were made using the molds from the 60mm sailors shown earlier on this page.  Note that the group includes on seven poses of the original ten.  The guard, rope puller, and mopper were not used.
Photo not available at this time.
Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time.
1.  Mel Park, carbine slung on shoulder 2.   Jim Maxwell, at attention 3.  Ken Lane, marching with rifle on shoulder 4.  David Ogden, officer with binoculars
(gray uniform)
Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time.
5.  Ken Bandoll, with duffle bag 6.  George Dempsey, officer at attention 7.  Phillip Perry, walking


     U.S. Sailors (white uniforms) - World War II
 
These are the same names and poses as in dark uniformed sailors shown above, only listed in a different order.

Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time.
1.  Ken Bandoll, with duffle bag 2.   Phillip Perry, walking
(African-American)
3.  George Dempsey, officer at attention 4.  Mel Park, carbine slung on shoulder
Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time. Photo not available at this time.
5.  Jim Maxwell, at attention  6.  Ken Lane, marching with rifle on shoulder  7.  David Ogden, officer with binoculars


     U.S. Marines - World War II
 
These were made with poses from the company's 60mm U.S. Marine group, which was used in many playsets.
Photo not available - we could use yours! Photo not available - we could use yours! Photo not available - we could use yours! Photo not available - we could use yours!
1.  Charlie Condon, at parade rest 2.  George DeSantis, at parade rest 3.  Sam Schultz, marching 4.  Jim Talbot, marching
Photo not available - we could use yours! Photo not available - we could use yours!
5.  Carl Gifford, marching 6.  Ed Hodes, at present arms 7.  Greg Campbell, at attention


Series III



     French Soldiers - World War I
 
To the best of my knowledge, these poses are found only as a part of this group.  I particularly like Pose 7, with Jules swinging his rifle like a club.  The only similar Marx figure I can recall is Davy Crockett, but I think Jules' pose is more realistic.
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
1.  Alexandre Delcasse, running with rifle 2.  Theophile Poincare, running with pistol 3.  Leon Pichon, marching, rifle on shoulder 4.  Maurice Valery, standing, firing rifle
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
5.  Andre Tredier, pointing, holding binoculars 6.  Joseph Frantz, stabbing with bayonet 7.  Jules Clemenceau, swinging rifle 8.  Chritian Gerard, throwing grenade


     German Soldiers - World War I
 
To the best of my knowledge, these poses are found only as a part of this group.
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
1.  Hans Ehlers, attacking with bayonet 2.  Heinrich Berstorff, crouching with rifle in right hand 3.  Friedrich Baden, marching with goose-step 4.  Max Hertling, kneeling
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
5.  Erich Haffman, throwing grenade 6.  Karl Bormann, holding sword and pistol 7.  Joseph Schnelling, standing with binoculars 8.  Anton Dunkern, advancing in gas mask

     British Soldiers - World War II
 
Again, to the best of my knowledge, these poses are found only as a part of this group.
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
1.  Robert Skinner, standing, shooting rifle 2.  Richard Cronin, advancing with machine gun 3.  Charles Brown, running with ammo box on shoulder 4.  Thomas Livingston, throwing grenade
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
5.  David Young, marching with rifle slung on shoulder 6.  Edward Bartholomew, running with pistol, waving 7.  Victor Robertson, marching with rifle on shoulder 8.  Eugene Black, running with rifle across chest


     German Soldiers - World War II
 
To the best of my knowledge, these poses are found only as a part of this group.  As shown, the PFPC article includes General Rommel as the ninth figure, standing on a pedestal base -- like the pedestal-base figures shown earlier on this page -- but I do not recall seeing any other reference to such a figure.
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
1.  Rudolt Ulbricht, saluting 2.  Walter Hess, throwing grenade 3.  Albert Galland, advancing with bayonetted rifle 4.  Ludwig Speer, walking with rifle held at right side
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
5.  Fritz Kuhn, rifle slung on right shoulder, waving with left hand 6.  Otto Schroeder, running with ammo box 7.  Martin Ferbach, standing, shooting rifle 8.  Walter Praum, standing at attention
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
9.  General Erwin Rommel
(on pedestal base)


Unknown Series


     Canadian Soldiers - World War II

The PFPC article includes no numbers for these figures and, for six, no names.  It provides photos of two, but I do not recall ever seeing any.
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
Don Yeates, advancing with rifle Phil Bramm, throwing grenade No name, standing, firing rifle No name, advancing with machine gun
Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours! Photo not available.  We would welcome yours!
No name, running, ammo can on shoulder No name, marching with rifle slung on shoulder No name, marching with rifle on shoulder No name, running with pistol, waving


                 



3-Inch Figures

Photo not available at this time.
1.  Marching
2.  Advancing, rifle held at waist
3.  Pistol in right hand, gesturing to rear
Three photos above courtesy of collector David Schafer

4.  Running with rifle at chest level

5.  Rifle held high in right hand 6.  Talking on radio, rifle in right hand
Two photos above courtesy of collector David Schafer
                            



4- and 5-Inch Figures

Marx had a few figures in this size -- such as vehicle drivers -- and these will be added at a future date.
                            



6-Inch Figures

In the mid-1960s, Marx produced a variety of figures approximately six inches tall that for the most part were sold individually unpackaged, today called bin toys by collectors.  In a few instances, figures were grouped with accessories -- such as military vehicles -- and sold as small playsets.  These figures were generally well-sculpted and finely detailed in soft plastic.  Many of the poses are similar to Marx poses in smaller scales.

The figures, which originally cost 10 or 15 cents, were somewhat popular, and many are plentiful today.  Common figures in very good condition will cost $15 to $25, but can be found is lesser condition at $5 or less.  Some of the scarcer themes -- such as the French World War I soldiers and the Scottish figures (shown below) -- will cost much more.  Both of these groups were made in Marx' Great Britain facility, and Plastic Figure and Playset Collector Issue 5 reports that few ever reached the U.S. market.

          U. S. Marines

1.  Throwing grenade
2.  Advancing, rifle in right hand
Missing end of rifle barrel

3.  Running with tommy gun, waving with right hand
4.  Shooting with rifle  

5.  Advancing with rifle at waist level  
6.  Hitting with rifle butt  

In addition to the standard six American foot soldiers above, Marx also made a few vehicles in this scale.  For these, drivers were necessary, and the photos below show two styles of them.  I welcome anyone to contribute more information and/or photos for any other drivers and also the vehicles they came with.

The two drivers below are very similar, but as shown, one has his helmet molded on and the other has a separate helmet that can be removed.  There are also other differences, such as the boots, the grenade, and the MP designation on the white figure's helmet.  In their seated positions, both are about 3-3/4 inches tall.  The boots on the white figure look strange to me, and I cannot help but wonder if perhaps he was meant to be from a country other than the USA.
Driver with helmet molded onto figure Driver with separate helmet without separate helmet
(Does that make sense?)
Driver holding separate helment Driver wearing separate helmet Separate helmet
(slightly enlarged to show detail)

          Russian Soldiers

1.  Throwing grenade
2.  Standing with rifle at waist
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev

3.  Running with machine gun
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
4.  Shooting with rifle  
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev

5.  Officer with pistol and binoculars
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
6.  Hitting with rifle butt  

          German Soldiers
            PL-1194

Photos below are courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev (Den71is@gmail.com).  I have adjusted them to be a bit lighter gray than they really are to help show the detail.  Why are there seven instead of six?  According to Denis, many people (i.e., parents) considered the "bayonetting downward" pose to be too violent, and Marx replaced it with another pose.
1.  Throwing grenade
2.  Waving, rifle slung on right shoulder

3.  Bayonetting downward
4.  Shooting with rifle  

5.  Advancing with rifle at waist level  
6.  Hitting with rifle butt  

7.  Running with machine gun

          British Soldiers

The British soldiers have the company's Swansea logo on the bottom of their base and are labeled as World War II soldiers.  However, I would agree with seller Tom Vida of Tiny Troops (from whom I bought the figure in the photo below) that their helmets make them look more like World War I.  Notably, when comparing the figures to the U. S. Marines pictured above and other 6-inch Marx figures commonly found in the U. S., it is obvious from the details of the figures that a different sculptor created the British figures.
1.  Firing rifle
2.  Advancing with pistol
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev

3.  Running, rifle in right hand
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
4.  Throwing grenade
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev 

5.  Advancing with rifle
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
6.  With mine sweeper
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev

          French Soldiers (World War I)

According to Plastic Figure and Playset Collector Issue 5, these were manufactured in Great Britain in 1964 for the European market and are not often found in the U.S.  Like the British figures above,
they have the company's Swansea logo on the bottom of their base.  Also, like the British figures, it is obvious from the details of the French figures that the set was created by a different sculptor than the one who made the U.S. Marines pictured above and other 6-inch Marx figures commonly found in the U.S.
1.  Firing rifle

2.  Clubbing with rifle
 Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev

3.  Running
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
4.  Calling to rear
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev 

5.  Kneeling with rifle
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev
6.  Kneeling with tommy gun
Photo courtesy of Russian collector Denis Rylev 

          Japanese Soldiers
1.  Holding binoculars, pointing
2.  Running with sword and pistol

3.  Advancing with rifle held forward
Photo courtesy of Denis Rylev
4.  Charging with machette
Photo courtesy of Denis Rylev 

5.  Firing rifle
Photo courtesy of Denis Rylev
6.  Throwing grenade
Photo courtesy of Denis Rylev 


          British Highlander Soldiers (Scots)

According to PFPC Issue 5, the bottom of the these figures are marked "1964, Made in Great Britain."  They are not often found in the U.S.  Photos below are courtesy of Russian collector Denis
Rylev (Den71is@gmail.com).
1.  With sword and pistol 2.  Advancing with rifle, wearing kilt

3.  Advancing with rifle, wearing pants 4.  Kneeling with rifle

5.  Running with sword 6.  Running with rifle
All photos above courtesy of Russian collector Dennis Rylev
                                                                           



GoldMarx Figures


Marx used some of the molds that produced 6-inch figures for what are called GoldMarx figures.  These are hard plastic, factory-painted figures.  I have also seen reference to some such figures using the same scale molds with poses not used elsewhere (see Rick Koch article in Plastic Figure and Playset Collector Issue 19).  GoldMarx figures, produced in Hong Kong during the early 1960s, were well-painted (espcially compared to Marx miniature painted figures) and are highly desireable among collectors today.  I have not been able to find a listing of the various GoldMarx groups.

          U. S. Marines
Photo not available at this time.
1.  Throwing grenade
2.  Advancing, rifle in right hand

Photo not available at this time.
3.  Running with tommy gun, waving with right hand
4.  Standing, firing rifle  

Photo not available at this time.
5.  Advancing with rifle at waist level  
6.  Hitting with rifle butt  
                                                      
          German Soldiers

1.  Standing at attention


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